Inequality across prefectures in Japan: An S factor analysis

Open Quantitative Sociology & Political Science, 2016

Abstract

Two datasets of Japanese socioeconomic data for Japanese prefectures (N=47) were obtained and merged. After quality control, there were 44 variables for use in a factor analysis. Indicator sampling reliability analysis revealed poor reliability (54% of the correlations were |r| > .50). Inspection of the factor loadings revealed no clear S factor with many indicators loading in opposite than expected directions.

A cognitive ability measure was constructed from three scholastic ability measures (all loadings > .90). On first analysis, cognitive ability was not strongly related to 'S' factor scores, r = -.19 [CI95: -.45 to .19; N=47]. Jensen's method did not support the interpretation that the relationship is between latent 'S' and cognitive ability (r = -.15; N=44). Cognitive ability was nevertheless related to some socioeconomic indicators in expected ways.

A reviewer suggested controlling for population size or population density. When this was done, a relatively clear S factor emerged. Using the best control method (log population density), indicator sampling reliability was high (93% |r|>.50). The scores were strongly related to cognitive ability r = .67 [CI95: .48 to .80]. Jensen's method supported the interpretation that cognitive ability was related to the S factor (r = .78) and not just to the non-general factor variance.


Keywords
cognitive ability, cognitive sociology, general socioeconomic factor, inequality, intelligence, IQ, Japan, prefectures, S factor

Reviewed by
Bryan J. Pesta, Noah Carl, L. J. Zigerell

Review time 111 days.