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[ODP] Educational attainment, income, use of social benefits, crime rate and the gene

#1
Title: Educational attainment, income, use of social benefits, crime rate and the general socioeconomic factor among 71 immmigrant groups in Denmark

Abstract:
We obtained data from Denmark for the largest 71 immigrants by country of origin. We show that three important social-economic variables are highly predictable from the Islam rate, IQ, GDP and height of the countries of origin. We further show that there is a general socio-economic factor and this too is very predictable.

Key words: National IQs, group differences, country of origin, Denmark, immigration

PDF attached. Source files attached.


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.pdf   educationalattainmentetcDenmark.pdf (Size: 646.63 KB / Downloads: 442)
.   Educational attainment, income, use of social benefits, crime rate and the general socioeconomic factor among 71 immmigr (Size: 1.98 MB / Downloads: 145)
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#2
The PISA standard deviation is generally 100; you could use that in the paper. The paper is pretty good and should be published.
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#3
The PISA SD was standardized as 100 between countries, not within a population. It is smaller there. The question is how small. The DA immigrant population is about ~90 IQ, so everything else equal, one might expect a .67 SD difference in the PISA scores. That fits well with a difference of about 60 points if the within population SD is somewhat smaller (perhaps 80).
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#4
No, the PISA SD is 100 within a population. An individual with a PISA score of 700 has an equivalent IQ of 130.
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#5
(2014-Apr-22, 07:09:52)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: No, the PISA SD is 100 within a population. An individual with a PISA score of 700 has an equivalent IQ of 130.


PISA 2009 Technical Report, p. 143 Wrote:The reporting scales that were developed for each of reading, mathematics and science in PISA 2000 were linear transformations of the natural logit metrics that result from the scaling as described above. The transformations were chosen so that the mean and standard deviation of the PISA 2000 scores was 500 and 100 respectively, for the equally weighted 27 OECD countries that participated in PISA 2000 that had acceptable response rates (Wu and Adams, 2002).


http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/50036771.pdf
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#6
(2014-Apr-22, 07:09:52)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: No, the PISA SD is 100 within a population. An individual with a PISA score of 700 has an equivalent IQ of 130.


You can check the average intranational SD by using PISA data explorer. Use the edit option to select statistics. For comparison groups you can use "by immigrant generations" as this will eliminate between relevant subgroup variance. In this case the SD is about 80.

http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/international/ide/
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#7
I didn't know that. Good find, Chuck.

I looked up the total Math score for PISA 2012 for Denmark.
Year Country Avg. SD
2012 Denmark 500 82

Danish origin, 508
Second gen. immigrant (western and non-western), 447
Difference, 61.
In SD units, 61/82=0.74

The estimated IQ for total immigrant population for 2013Q2 was 89.9, so about .67 SD under Danish origin.

It's rather close at this aggregate level.
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#8
(2014-Apr-22, 16:50:07)Emil Wrote: I didn't know that. Good find, Chuck.

I looked up the total Math score for PISA 2012 for Denmark.
Year Country Avg. SD
2012 Denmark 500 82


The pooled 2012 math SD for "natives" and "migrants" was 79. (With explorer, you can break PISA scores down by generations e.g,. "native", "second", "first".) Usually when computing between groups differences one uses pooled SDs, not total, since one wants to eliminate variance due to between group differences.
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#9
The dataset for my estimate of the immigrant population is here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?..._web#gid=0

It is based on LV's NIQ's and my additions as well as census 2013Q2 data. Text is in Danish, but it should be guessable from context.

I used the total SD to calculate the danish-immigrant d from the army sample. Perhaps we should calculate the pooled SD to see if that makes a difference. Dataset here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?..._web#gid=0
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#10
(2014-Apr-22, 19:57:55)Emil Wrote: I used the total SD to calculate the danish-immigrant d from the army sample. Perhaps we should calculate the pooled SD to see if that makes a difference. Dataset here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?..._web#gid=0


No. The difference is marginal and not worth the time if you are dealing with more than a couple of groups.


Quote:The dataset for my estimate of the immigrant population is here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?..._web#gid=0

I didn't know that you had scores broken down by ethnic groups. Why didn't you compute a correlation coefficient? The problem I saw with your paper is that it didn't indicate if NIQ actually predicted migrant IQ.
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