Hello There, Guest!  
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 

[ODP] The Global Hereditarian Hypothesis and the NLSF

#1
We discuss the global hereditarian hypothesis of race differences in g and test it on data from the NLSF. We find that migrants country of origin's IQ predicts GPA and SAT/ACT.

Keywords: National IQs, race differences, country of origin, NLSF
Posted: 3/24/2014

Attached files: Layout PDF, source PDF


Attached Files
.pdf   global_hereditarian_edit7(1).pdf (Size: 227.23 KB / Downloads: 338)
 Reply
#2
The term "afro-Americans" is archaic and should probably not be used. Correct the correlations for range restriction and SLODR when possible (people who take, e.g., the GMAT tend to be high-IQ). This paper should be published after these corrections are made.
 Reply
#3
(2014-Mar-25, 02:31:50)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: The term "afro-Americans" is archaic and should probably not be used. Correct the correlations for range restriction and SLODR when possible (people who take, e.g., the GMAT tend to be high-IQ). This paper should be published after these corrections are made.


The use of "afro-Americans" is to refer to persons of predominantly African genetic background living in the US. Similarly with euro-Americans, just for Europe. One could substitute "African Americans", but why bother? One cannot substitute "African" since the American Africans are special, having a degree of European admixture. What do you propose?
 Reply
#4
"African-Americans" is more commonly used and should be used here as well. It is understood that American blacks are partly white.
 Reply
#5
(2014-Mar-25, 03:21:30)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: "African-Americans" is more commonly used and should be used here as well. It is understood that American blacks are partly white.


Google confirms your claim. "african american" was vastly more popular than "afro-american". I guess we will have to change "euro-american" too.
 Reply
#6
(2014-Mar-25, 02:31:50)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: The term "afro-Americans" is archaic and should probably not be used. Correct the correlations for range restriction and SLODR when possible (people who take, e.g., the GMAT tend to be high-IQ). This paper should be published after these corrections are made.


I'll make the first change. As for correlation corrections, could you provide an example of someone who does this in regards to national IQ correlations? I actually don't know how to, since our migrant variable is a group level one; as we aggregated individual scores, our range is the range of scores of national diasporas; we have no idea what the unrestricted variance, which we would need to know to make the corrections, would be since we have no unrestricted national level samples of SAT/ACT takers -- in fact we have no other samples.
 Reply
#7
Perhaps just mention that your correlations are likely attenuated. Or perform another analysis using Rindermann's 'smart fraction' numbers as covariates.
 Reply
#8
(2014-Mar-25, 02:53:06)Emil Wrote: [quote='Elijah Q. Armstrong' pid='68' dateline='1395707510']
The term "afro-Americans" is archaic and should probably not be used. Correct the correlations for range restriction and SLODR when possible (people who take, e.g., the GMAT tend to be high-IQ). This paper should be published after these corrections are made.



I will mention the issue with attenuation. With regards to SLODR, I am not sure what you have in mind. Can you elaborate? Generally, we are planning to replication this analysis using non-elite samples e.g., the New Immigrant Survey, NLSY97, etc -- so we didn't attempt to make adjustments. It was more of an exploratory analysis.
 Reply
#9
SLODR weakens correlations between cognitive ability tests on the national level (Coyle, T. R., & Rindermann, H. [2013]. Spearman’s Law of Diminishing Returns and national ability. Personality and Individual Differences 55, 406-410).
 Reply
#10
(2014-Mar-25, 06:42:19)Elijah Q. Armstrong Wrote: SLODR weakens correlations between cognitive ability tests on the national level (Coyle, T. R., & Rindermann, H. [2013]. Spearman’s Law of Diminishing Returns and national ability. Personality and Individual Differences 55, 406-410).


The reduction is extremely small and not worth mentioning IMO.

About the restrictions of range. It is not clear how this works at the level of group correlations. The individuals in the groups are restricted in range, yes, but the groups?
 Reply
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 
 
 
Forum Jump:

Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)